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of the economic downturn, the education in our country has had to squeeze from every angle, city budgets for education have dropped, state budgets have dropped, so it makes it challenging most experts would say to believe our students in the future will be competing on a level playing field with other students around the world because the bigger class size is now and less time with quality teachers. how would you improve education first of all and in fact mr. smith you suggested eliminating the department of education altogether. is that the right plan at this moment? casey: the best place is that the state level. that is where between the local school boards, teachers and parents. now i don't -- i said i wanted to take a look at the department of education, and it's possible. but they do some good things so we don't want to throw that away. but we need -- any federal organizations basically as big as the department of education there is a lot waste. just to get that money to the states. they can do it themselves and that is a state issue but it would be more economical doing that. and w
about education in america. every president as long as i can remember has been the education president. he is going to be the guy. i wanted to fulfill that thing. i have another thing. arthur miller said the best thing you can hope for is the end up with the right regrets. i have this regret, one of my regrets that i was not the best student. i didn't understand the teacher was trying real hard and that was his life for her life's work and i was one of those guys who tried to jar my way through and do as little as possible to get by. if i spend as much time studying as a did conniving i would have been all right. i have that regret too and it is one of the things that we have to deal with now if we are going to fix education, the kids have to understand that this is a very important moment in their lives and it is not like it was when i was a kid that you could fool around. i got lucky but even if you didn't, in those days you could get an assembly line jobs and have a middle-class life because the country would give you that but that is not the way it is anymore. let me cut to the cha
aggravated by these preferences. that means "mismatch" affects higher education. >> another two or three minutes. >> one thing we talk about is another sign of racial preference, prominent in the discussion which is the diversity interest of schools. one of the things research has shown that we talk about in the book is how much the diversity affects, moderated by the academic distance, when you admit students with large preferences they are less likely to socially interact with peers of other raises. this is very well documented by research. there is also self doubt affects of low grades. one study found students who believe they were admitted on preference are more vulnerable to serious arms threat. diversity research when looked at carefully fits nicely into c-span2 -- "mismatch" findings, talking about these various effects, then we go into problems of institutional behavior and that is a large part of the problem. wanting to demonstrate these effects but it is another to get institutions of higher education to deal with that. when you only look of the lineup to see how uniform is th
yours. he'll voucherize medicare and make catastrophic cuts to education. so remember what romney said and what his name would do. >> paul: taking our name in vein, the 15th time, the wall street journal does not agree with any of the-- >> what do you think? >> this is a-- this is a distilled message (laughter) of the campaign. >> he keeps returning to this class warfare theme and this is in ohio and thinks the outsourcing, hitting the rich. 47% plays well with less educated white men in the midwest and where he's focusing ads. >> paul: is that really a good closing argument, dan? that's not an argument for the second term. >> it's not. and i honestly do not understand it, paul. it's -- i think it reflects barack obama's antipathy toward mitt romney? >> personal? >> i think so, he's been wanting to take him down from the beginning. and he's been running the same campaign from the beginning. and voters are out there still the economy the number one issue, waiting for the president to tell them what his plan is for a second term to get the economy growing than the jobs report this week s
later about education, higher education is often the first thing on the menu to cut in many states because young people don't vote in as great a number. that needs to be clearer and more boldly stated by the candidates. >> it's an interesting point. if i'm tutoring at the neighborhood school, i get the instant gratification. if i vote for a candidate, the candidate is a messy sort of things. it also feels to me, ben, part of what that distinction is between charity and justice. charity feels good but justice takes a long time. i hate to do the, oh, young people need to cultivate patience thing, but it does feel a little like that sense. >> look at our culture. we have the high speed internet, fast food. meanwhile you have a gridlocked congress where very little, if not anything is getting done. i think this was the least productive congress ever. >> on purpose. >> reconciling those two forces at odds is difficult for those people. >> we'll come right back to you, valerie and felicia. when we come back, young voters out there, if you're listening, president obama really does have a
and that means the mismatch is something that affects a swath of the education. >> how much time do i have left? >> one of the things we talk about is another side of the racial preferences and the prominent in the discussions which is the diversity interest the schools and having a diverse racial climate. how much the diversity affects are moderated by the academic distance and the schools in other words when you add that students with large preferences they are much less likely to socially interact with your of the other races. this has been very well documented by the research. there's also self doubt affect into the stereotypes one study even taunt the students who believe they were admitted on a preference are more vulnerable. so the diversity of research when we look at it carefully it fits very nicely, it's very closely into the mismatched finance. so with all of this about half of the book talking devotees affect then we go into the problems of institutional behavior, and that is a large part of the problem. it's one thing to demonstrate these effects as they exist and the evidence does
levees. i kept thinking, the category 5 levees we need are shelter and quality education and health care for everybody and infrastructure and transportation so that people can move on. is there any possibility of taking that and making it a broader conversation, environmental policy or housing policy that makes it easier to manage this? >> i think there is. i agree with neera that people like this post-partisan moment. they are tired of partisan politics and nothing getting done. we need it all. we need education and infrastructure. bloomberg endorsed obama citing global warming as the cause. twice in the last 14 months, new york city has had to evacuate. that has never happened before in the city's history. all these things are in play. this has changed the dynamic. there is a sense we need to move on this. i wish we could have bipartisan agreement on how to move forward. >> it is tough to have bipartisan agreement when republicans keep being climate change designers and anti-science in a variety of ways. >> anti-science, we are still dealing with 46 million people on food stamps. we ar
challenges of the week. i'm honored to be here, your appreciation for the penn state and higher education. we need your continued engagement. again, thank you for joining us. thank you for bringing along the penn state cookies. [laughter] according to google news, there's over 45,000 stories about penn state and sandusky. you've written them. you've read them. i imagine that most of you have formed an opinion about penn state and our actions over the last year. beyond the headlines, there's another reality, one that exists for penn state's 96,000 students, 44,000 full and part-time faculty and staff, and over 550,000 living alumni. it's a world of teaching, research, and service. it's a world with an $800 million research program, hundreds of degrees offered, 24 campuses, online world campus, academic health center, a law school, and 157 years of tradition. it's also a world that has continued to face ongoing controversies surrounding jerry sandusky, our board of trustees, current and former administrators, and me. the legal process continues to unfold as evidence by the attorney generals fur
education in missouri? especially given the educational choices you have made for your own children. i am referring to your decision to home school your children and senator mccaskill's to send at least one of her children to private catholic schools. >> thank you for that question. all of us understand that education is critical. one of the things we have in america is something called the freedom. people can choose to educate the way that they want. we need to preserve that freedom. one of the things i have done that not another congressman in missouri has done is to vote no on no children left behind. i do not have abiding faith in the government to fix problems in education. even though it was my president who offer the bill, i told them no. i do not think all of the red tape in washington, d.c. helps our schools. i was willing to stand on the basis of principle the education needs to be local. what makes the best education is when you have a mom and dad that loves their kid and puts a high priority on education. with that kind of formula, education can work well for people. i support
. third was this body mass of education. the education is good in some pockets of the region and that in some. how can we use smarter principles, raced to the top, whatever. but it's really focused on what are the problems. let's take our breath and move on to the others. >> so that they take care and also folks have questions. the microphones are here. what i take from this conversation i want to get your response on the advice is to think about the city is a network of players, some very large, like a henry ford medical come even some of the cultural institutions, some of the employers, et cetera. a network of players who can take their own responsibility, obviously in partnership with the government around certain sets of issues. and the michael's point about what is the right issue to tackle because in the southeast, there's no water. last time i checked, you got lots of water, the great lakes. not your problem. but there's obviously a number of issues, whether it's run energy, education, health. this strikes me as a way to get around the challenge of government is dysfun
sectors of the economy -- education, health care, energy -- that haven't really been disrupted that much in the last 25 years, what i think of as the first internet revolution, getting everybody to believe it was important, get connected, multiple devices, multiple networks, that's sort of been accomplished. the second revolution is how you use the mobility of the internet to transform other aspects of life. those are worthy, you know, great entrepreneurs across the country are supporting, and they are the industries that are going to drive, you know, the future. initially, it was sort of the agriculture revolution, kind of, you know, the midwest and then sort of the industrial revolution and then sort of the finance and media revolution, more recently the technology revolution, the next wave is where we need to be positioned as a nation, and we really need to recognize these entrepreneurs are in some ways american heroes, too, because they're the ones who are taking the risk of starting these companies that can change the world, but also make sure we have a robust, growing economy in wh
inside his head. it is not history. it is more entertaining than itg is educational.add to but it is one thing the genre to actual history. >> was your day job? >> i teach at george washington. university. >> we have been talking to thomas and here is his novel. watergate. sir, thank you for being with us here on booktv at the national book festival in. >> next, in 1995, professor irvine tran-nines discuss his book "neo-conservatism: the autobiogrpahy of an idea." selected essays of 1949 to 1995 with brian lamb. he talked at length about the development of his personal philosophy, which began with marxism in the 1940s. .. c-span: what does it mean? >> guest: what it means is that--it refers to a constellation of opinions and views that is not traditionally conservative but is conservative and is certainly not liberal. and since i and others who have been called neo-conservatives move from being liberals to being a kind of conservative, then neo-conservatism seemed like a pretty good term. c-span: i did some calculations on the 41 different essays you have in the book
legitimate and getting an education and making sure that your relationships, people were legitimately married. anything that pointed back words or made you illegitimate was not really something they wanted to talk about and have out there. it is too bad because it closed a lot of doors in our family and that is what you found in michele obama's family. very fortunate, you were able to help and truly open those doors for her family. >> at least with been -- within her family, there are those conversations happening. as i said americans, ordinary americans across the country are making these discoveries with dna testing so these conversations are happening around the country. when you talk about marriage and the importance of legitimacy, one of the other stories which talks about the variations of the american experience during slavery was the first lady's family had ancestors who were freed for decades before the civil war and one of the most interesting records i came across was a record which showed those members of her family who after the civil war went to the courthouse and lined up to ge
's to educate our students more and to tie them to technology. >> reporter: of the 1.4 million people who use the state's new online voter registration system about half of them were younger voters. maureen naylor, ktvu news. >>> a college education without the tuition. >> it's like coming out west in the gold rush. there's this big area who are trying to get in and we have no idea where it's going to go. >> the new trend in education and why some students feel cheated. >> at 10:45, sending supplies to areas hit hard by sandy. the big mobilization effort at travis. [ female announcer ] safeway presents real big deals of the week. or how to get great prices on things you need. heading into the holidays you look for the best deals. that's why we give you real big club card deals each week. right now, get a super low price on tide, $10.99 for 100 ounces. 12 rolls of bounty are $11.99. that's a dollar a roll! and charmin is $11.99 for 30 rolls. real big deals this week and every week. only at safeway. ingredients for life. >>> get ahead with a college education for the cost of an internet connect
-centric for something in the future. to me, both of those reasons focus on this time of investing in education and development of future capabilities, tactics, techniques, and procedures. we have to invest in that going forward. >> could i do a short follow-up? what does that approach imply for the army civilians and contractors? do they become diminished? >> they might in terms of numbers, but it will still play a role. >> and how do you incorporate the planning of what those numbers need to be, particularly on the contractor side? >> you want to have the right balance. again, contractors provide us with its unique capabilities that we simply do not have. that is what they will focus on. we have department of army civilians that will provide continuity and consistency that we need. then you need our military members in order to provide us with experience, expertise, and frankly sometimes, just the validity of what we are trying to do based on their experiences. that is where and try to capture the right mix. right now, it is overbalanced toward contractors and civilians. i'm trying to rebalan
underestimate the economic stability and giving a child a good education. if parents are working multiple jobs, it's hard to be a good parent, hard to be there for the parent/teacher conferences. inso far as this alleviates economic stress, i think it's great. >> is this the reason behind this, though? >> this is -- that's why it's a two-fold answer. the second part is, there's something that feels not quite right about having to incentivize good parenting. >> let me challenge that for a second. if at the end of the day -- and you're right, it's all about getting better education for kids, and if although it's horrible -- >> and crass -- >> but if this gets the job done as the ceo, i say do it. >> you may think there's an ick factor. >> if it gets the job done, i'm for it. >> and offering a buffet lunch will get a parent in to care about their child and their child's relationship with that school, then that's what you need to do. whatever's necessary. >> let's do our next topic, football dancing. i know star's a big football fan. >> exactly. >> the jacksonville jaguars are trying to -- >> jack
. they register under the tax code 501 c 4. the organizations that are primarily about educating people about issues or policy options and things like that but they're allowed to do some political activity. it can't be the main thing they're about. but they are permitted to be in politics. and now because ofthe decisions from 2010 that are so famous they can be more specific in the way they're involved. the things that define the elections are -- because they're mainly about enl indicating people have been able to do that -- educating people and not mainly about elections, they have been able to do that without disclosing the sources of the money that they've gotten. so tense or hundreds of millions of dollars being spent without us knowing where it actually came from. host: let's go to our democrats line. caller: what i would like to say about this money, i feel like this money is basically it's generations of money which a lot of elderly white people have built up over time when the system was discriminatory. now they have come out and decided to buy an election. this money is not taxed or
measures that would raise money for education and money in education is in dire straits. it's okay to vote for both. i also do support gross receipts. and i'm a small business person, and i wanted to let you all know that i have done sort of looked what i pay now $9,000. i have seven employees and i pay $9,000 a year and i will pay $750. so for small businesses the gross receipts actually does help and does not put the burden on the little guy and it is progressive and so it does become progressively as you make more money. many one concern with small businesses there are businesses out there that have a lot of gross receipts, but they have no profit. and this is something that the only thing that concerns about those two things. finally i would be okay with reinstating the vehicle license fee at the levels it was before. >> thank you. candidate john rizzo, who could not join us tonight said in response to the survey that his "top policy objective was better management of the city." if the city's growing liabilities outpace revenue, what poorly managed programs could be reformed or elimin
. those are two measures that would raise money for education and money in education is in dire straits. it's okay to vote for both. i also do support gross receipts. and i'm a small business person, and i wanted to let you all know that i have done sort of looked what i pay now $9,000. i have seven employees and i pay $9,000 a year and i will pay $750. so for small businesses the gross receipts actually does help and does not put the burden on the little guy and it is progressive and so it does become progressively as you make more money. many one concern with small businesses there are businesses out there that have a lot of gross receipts, but they have no profit. and this is something that the only thing that concerns about those two things. finally i would be okay with reinstating the vehicle license fee at the levels it was before. >> thank you. candidate john rizzo, who could not join us tonight said in response to the survey that his "top policy objective was better management of the city." if the city's growing liabilities outpace revenue, what poorly managed programs could be
. it is the highest income region. it has people with the highest educational level and the state on average. it tends to be the most democratic region. if you go down to tidewater and hampton roads, that is a heavy defense industry area. it is a white-collar and blue- collar and has a large african- american population. it also has a relatively low nativity rape, people there were not necessarily born in virginia. the navy brings in many people from across the nation and the world. the richmond area as an urban area but it is probably the most conservative urban region in this area. it might be one of the most conservative and the country. it is a traditional area particularly because the west side of richmond -- the east side is heavily african-american and the west side is predominantly white and conservative and has a high negativity rate. some of the counties have become more diverse but by and large, it is also a conservative area. you can include far southwest virginia as a world unto itself. it used to beat republican but mountain valley republican, more liberal republican and now -- and then
develop its domestic rail infrastructure and matured through training and education and managing that rail system through the creation of a career in transportation. think about growing saudi arabia and talent and not hiring saudi arabians. many are aggressive in seeking out saudi arabian students for some programs. now, as they graduate, we will bring them on for training within the company. with the intent of starting them out in entry-level managers and engineers in the kingdom. they are starting a career. not just being hired on for a job. they did all this. they beat the competition. they won. other american companies are making a significant impact. not just on their businesses, but also on the future of saudi arabia. exxon mobil has a long tradition in the kingdom. among their success is a huge refinery about two hours north of a main city. the refinery has 92% saudi arabian employees. stretching all the way from management to blue-collar employees. exxon mobil was into saudia station before saudia station was required. we anticipate this to the same degree of the new refinery that
. nobody else can do this to the extent we can. we have very sharp people, well-educated, well schooled and trained particularly in the medical profession's to make a difference on things. and we have this ongoing research and development as background to make us all better at doing these things. so, these are the basics, and one of the things we would like to draw out today is what else is there that we should understand, what else can we do, how can we take these attributes and capabilities and maybe make them better? i won't want to monopolize all the time, but i would like to throw my desire on the table, and that is it's been a great honor, and i have to admit an eye opener at first to go around the world to places that are certainly less privileged than we are and to see the dedicated efforts of so many people not just from this country but many other countries who are trying to make a difference in places that need help with is a medical area or general health and welfare of people advancing their education, let in this venue the fundamental security, personal security through be
lots of water. there is any number of issues, whether it is around energy or education. this strikes me as a way to get around the challenge of government is dysfunctional and compartmentalize. you have a lot here. it seems like this might be part of the solution. >> before i comment about that, i want to be sure that we do not forget those have been unemployed so long they are out of the workforce. real question will skill readiness. i do not want to forget them in the equation. it is music my ears to hear the definition of the problem and information. it is music to my ears to hear that. we have a piecemeal approach of a couple of initiatives. they're really attract well to analyze and a city that is depopulating. you're trying to talk about redefining wealth. i think of the outbidding the police cars with the cameras, everybody has done that i think. both of those were seeded with grant money. when the grant ran out, we have not been able to keep up. there needs to be that money, whether it be federal or state. there needs to be this institutional approach that redefines. we have bee
for us to make sure we are investing in the education and development of future capabilities and techniques and procedures. we've got to invest in that as we go forward. >> got into a short short follow-up on the? what does that approach apply -- apply for both contractors or? they become diminished. >> i mean, i think potentially they might ask little bit spent in terms of numbers spent in terms of numbers, but they will still play a role. they are not a limited at all spent how do you incorporate into planning what those numbers need to be? u.. >> based on their experiences. so i think that's what we're trying to capture is that right mix. what i'm saying right now is it's overbalanced. i'm trying to rebalance it again. >> got it. nate? >> yes, sir. there's a lot of discussion so far about what we want to do and can do. what are some of the areas specifically that you think that the army going forward can assume more risk in capability and competencies as we sort of deal with an era of declining or plateauing resources? >> yeah. i mean, i think it's not, i think risk and ca
of mumps outbreak. apparently it was a face to face educational message views among the orthodox jews. researchers say the outbreak indicates how close repeated contact with an affected person can overwhelm the vaccine. most of those infected have been properly vaccinated. the risk may be higher when the exposure dose is large or intensely transmitted. it may explain why it tends to be less effective. finally, trends in death rates for children who have diabetes. by be struck by over half in 2008 from 2.6 9 million in the '60s. better treatment may be responsible for that drop. the largest decline was seen in kids under the age of 10 but there has been a slight increase in diabetes-related death among teenagers since the late 1980's. that includes types 1 and 2 diabetes. doppler check out the and switch over to the computer. you will see what is happening on the radar screen as far as the scattered showers go in our area. looks like that is locked up as well. a look at the future cast for the region as we head into the next few days. it looks like it may well be a factor in the weathe
. but other benefits are also important such as childcare, education and employment services, cash assistance, energy assistance. and others, housing and others, wic, school meals can also be included in the package. the technology that is available, the cloud, the enterprise architecture, the rules engine can unlearning all these terms, it makes it possible. it really expands the degree to which information can be shared and things can be streamlined. but the policies and procedures and how human beings interact with those systems behind the scenes and in front of the scenes, it's also very important. i do think there is a one size fits all kind of approach. the states along with local communities and the federal government with input from others need to figure out how a coherent vision to be made to package all these benefits together. right now in most states people who applied to the human services door are able to access health benefits. especially lowest income families. but there's a risk i think under health care reform that as states, states may split sort of the health, health peace
taken jobs and they're not using their educational background or their training. the food stamp number show how tough the economy is. 17% on food stamps. i'm glad we have unemployment programs and food stamp programs and i'm glad we have a number of companies that have come to delaware. we have not done enough. we have to much burdensome regulation. we still raised taxes during this recession which we drove back. personal income tax and we need to create a stable business environment. we have not done a good enough job creating that environment and that is borne out by the numbers. >> where do you stand on your blueprint for delaware? >> we have implemented the majority of items in their and we have more to go. some of them we did not have the resources. i said we ought to create a delaware version of a cops bill. we have made progress there as well. it is not spin to the hundreds of workers were back at the refinery. it is not spin to the people who decided to expand in delaware. it is not spin to the folks at foxfire printing who are adding dozens of jobs. it is not spin to the peopl
, google, and apple, and other countries to educate myself on what the trends in this industry are because information technology world is going to be driving our entire economy in ways we can't understand now. ewe can tell from doug's niche titch what they look at is going to be significant for all industry. privacy is one part of it, but given the active nature of the current administration, that's just a perfectly ripe area for a tremendous amount of litigation and regulation to break out. i want to make sure i understand it, and i hope you guys will take general up on his invitation to participate in that effort because initiatives coming from the national ag's association can be very, very significant as you all know. >> well, as you all can see, no longer just the down ballot state office holder slot. these ag's are making an impact across the country on a number of issues, and i hope you will stay focused on what they are doing and provide them your input. thank you so much. give them a round of applause. [applause] glnchtsz more from the conference now from the mayor rudy guiliani
education and advocacy. membership is open to all citizens of voting age, male and female. the league is an organization that does not endorse or oppose any of the local candidate or party. the league does make an effort to obtain factual information on a candidate's views and issues and then distributes this information as widely as possible. our purpose in holding this is to help you, the citizens, understand the candidates reasons and qualifications for seeking public office. to help potential voters better understand the issues that are facing congress and encourage citizens in the district to vote in the general election on november 6, 2012 only three weeks from today. a very important part of tonight's forum is the questions that you will be asking and you will have a chance to ask these candidates. we do have some ground rules. first and foremost you'll notice there are a couple of video cameras. other than that, there will be no ideography, photographs, smartphone videos, anything of the sort tolerated. and then also, turn your cell phone to silent or off at this point so we d
, , because i might not be able to take care of you," that is important to a senior citizen. on education, people need to really dig and find out what the educational programs are all about. it is more money and more money. it is all for the unions. if there were things going on in the school that the parents could see, instead of being pushed aside because the government wants to take over the children, and not let the parents have anything to say -- there are other subjects as well as the middle-class. host: will give you a chance to respond to some of her comments. guest: i think she is right. all the voters should have an opportunity to look behind the ads and build into the research on the individual candidates. they should come out knowing this country needs a change in direction, and who will create the number of jobs that are necessary. i think governor mitt romney has that program, if you look at it in depth. his commitment to produce 12 million jobs over the next four years, the way this country has to do. also, to take regulation out of the small business community, so that our
't know -- maybe you can answer, maybe you can give me some sort of education on this. but for the most part, i mean, naturally animals in the wild do they naturally go after their own sex to reproduce? i don't think so. age sex is -- >> let me answer the caller in very direct terms. sex orientation is a characteristic of being human. i think put more simply, i was born this way no different than straight americans were born straight. one of the questions that i always like to ask people when we're having this conversation is when did you choose to be straight? people think about that for three or four seconds and they're like well i didn't choose to be straight, i was born this way. well the same applies to me. i can assure you that nothing happened. i didn't really have a conversation with myself and decide to be gay. god made me this way and i'm very proud of that. and so to the extent that we understand that the caller was born straight and i was born gay and we're able to kind of get over that understanding, then i think we come to an easy conclusion that we both deserve to be trea
, the facility offers three master's degree programs using german educational standards. >> in the egyptian desert directly next to the resort is where you'll find the egyptian satellite campus of the technical university of berlin. the campus cost 40 million euros to build. it is the brainchild of an egyptian multimillion there. the result is the 10,000 square meter campus. students enrolled in energy engineering, urban development, and water engineering. as to the body consists of 27 men and three women from india, china, south africa and egypt. >> i want a program that is more or less a mix of here and abroad. i did not want to do two consecutive years in germany, and i'm afraid i will never come back to egypt. >> the university wants students to go home when they graduate and contribute to their country's development. this didn't come from johannesburg to study water and engineering. she will be spending her second semester in berlin. >> i am looking forward to it. hopefully i come back in october. that should be really cool. i look forward to meeting new people in berlin in making new
-elected he's going to say every good thing you can think of about education but in the final analysis heel do what his biggest supporters, the public sector unions insist upon and your kids will be in the same schools with the same results. when i'm president i'm going to be a voice of the children and the parents. there's no union for the p.t.a. [applause] i'm going to make sure parents have the information they need to know if their school is succeeding or failing and i want them to have the choice they can pick the school where their child can succeed. [applause] i've watched over these last few months as our campaign has gathered the strength of a movement, not only size of crowds like this, it's the depth of our shared conviction. our readiness for new possibilities. the sense that our work is soon to begin. it's made me strive more to be worthy of your support, to campaign as i would govern. to speak for the aspirations of all americans. i learned the best achievements are shared apreevementcheevements. i learned respect go along way and are returned in kind. that's how i'll conduct mys
're going to make money off of them. i think what needs to happen is education and the reality is people that come from party buses generally once they're inside the club they don't drink. they don't buy drinks. there is often some deal worked out and they're not paying the door fee and if we can educate clubs and one it's more of a problem they want to deal with and they're not going to maikt money off of it that's one way we can help resolve the issue. >> all right. >> >> mr. hyde. >>i think there can be some sort of regulation for the buses. i think part of the problem it falls under the category of limousines so that's why they can serve alcohol and i think the number of people and the amount of alcohol -- if you could have some sort of regulation on that, and i have spoken to tom amano who is the chair of the public safety and he is very happy to create some trailing legislation, so i don't think that we should let this drop because this is one of the biggest problems that i hear about from community members and i think if we have the ability to create some change we should pursu
with the exception of brookland educational which may be closed because of power problems. and most halloween secelebratio will go on and scheduled. you can find a list of cancelled parades on nbc washington dot com. >> amtrak announced tonight that there will be no acela service in tnortheast corridor tomorrow. transportation reporter adam tusk with the latest now on tomorrow's commute. >> metro rail and metro busses running once again, but on a sunday schedule. that means service isn't running as frequently as it normally would. staying on the routes will return to normal on wednesday. emergency $15 d.c. taxi surcharge now gone. at the airport, still a tricky situation. this morning, a limited number of flights getting off the ground today. but as you can imagine, if you had a flight out of the area today or even tomorrow, good chance you're looking at some sort of impact whether it's a delay or cancellation. >> breaking news in new jersey now. the mayor of hoboken has told msnbc there are 20,000 people stranded in their homes in that town. mayor don zimmer says half of the city is flooded
for the next four years: making education and training a national priority; building on our manufacturing boom; boosting american-made energy; reducing the deficits responsibly by cutting where... we can, and asking the wealthy to pay a little more. and ending the war in afghanistan, so we can... do some nation-building here at home. that's the right path. so read my plan, compare it to governor romney's... and decide which is better for you. it's an honor to be your president... and i'm asking for your vote... so together, we can keep moving america forward. i'm barack obama and i approve this message. athat's what the plan georged allen supports... would cost our economy. newspapers called it "economically destructive." like allen's votes to give tax breaks to companies... that ship jobs overseas, his economic plan would... help big corporations, devastating the middle class. allen even voted against tax breaks for small businesses. virginia can't afford to go back to george allen. the democratic senatorial campaign committee... is responsible for the content of this advertising. look, the r
any democratic president has done. that's a pretty big deal. and i think education reform with the grants are also really important. so he has done stuff but what is interesting to me, and i don't fully understand is, why not campaign on that? >> eliot: robert has made a point. chrystia you're right. in terms of wealth, income and. >> healthcare was a distraction because he followed hillary clinton's advice. he didn't have a single payer. he didn't have any robust public option. he did nothing to control costs nothing. >> but isn't it better than nothing? >> look, if i lived in a swing state i would vote for obama no doubt about it. romney scares me. he wants to give wall street a bank check. he is a greater evil. >> eliot: you were clear you said he's the lesser of two evils. >> obama. >> eliot: yes. you did not describe him in the affirmative vote. >> you know this better than i do. when you put lawrence sumners in and timothy geithner, you are clear about it. i would have voted for you. that's why i came on this show. seriously, you had the right mentionmessage. i'm not
academy to take care of her grieving mother father during months of brokenness, sacrificing her education. the people of richmond, georgia and surrounding areas welcomed matthew home with tears, flags and salutes. the streets are lined for 17 miles from the airport to the church. local choirs joined to sing at his memorial service as a method in church that helped raise him. knowing matthew had been an eagle scout and a local boy scout by collecting pens and paper and sent them to matthew's unit in afghanistan. a dear friend, jim bunn who is involved in media had a vision and the matthew freeman project again. he dedicated much time and energy to produce a short film that launched the project on memorial day 2010. since then, with the help of so many volunteers, he can't name them all, the project has spent over seven tons of school supplies to soldiers are buried for humanitarian efforts in afghanistan. matthew small town of richmond hill, now a city of savanna and our great army bases at fort stewart and hunter army airfield in savanna air guard to help me heal by supporting the matthew
program, clear-cut ways to improve education. >> joe, i remember a couple of years ago -- >> i do it every year. >> but a series of wonderful articles, before the midterm for "time" magazine. you talked over a lot of the midwest, middle class. and you found that the -- china came up ten times as often as afghanistan -- >> 20. >> 20 types as often as afghanistan. when you look at the -- what an average middle-class american family is facing, particularly kind of people who work in factories, they're up against probably a generation of this kind of wage competition and -- possibly wage deflation because of china, things. do you -- what do you think happens to the politics of america if that middle class is not appreciably better five, six, eight years from now? >> well, we're heading toward, i think, a demographic period of real difficulty as the white majority declines. and there's -- and there's a fear of -- out in the middle of the country of this new america that's emerging that is so multicultural, multiethnic. but i do think -- once again, i'm going to be slightly optimistic here becau
a devastating effect on education in california. >> if prop 30 fails, school and colleges would face $6 billion in cuts. the trigger cuts as governor brown is calling them. small business action committee is pushing hard to defeat the msh measure saying higher taxes will drive away jobs. >> for more, we sat down with governor jerry brown at kcbs myself and our first question is, okay, look, this isn't the first time that voters in california have been asked to bail out the state budget. why isn't it fixed and why should they go for this? >> the last ten yards to go over the goal line is this money for schools. it's an either/or. on or off. either money in to schools or money out of schools. i wish it didn't have to be this way. but at the end of the day i hope people know that 99% of the people will not pay this income tax. it's only 1% and what people will pay is a penny when they get a $400 cappucino or a sandwich. a penny. if you buy $8 purchase, it's two pennies. our schools are at risk. we have been cutting classes. we are raising tuition. we have been shortening the school year. i'm telli
and pet neighborhood and their initiative, be it education and farming. everyone was dependent upon detroit. other people you know, feel that it's their responsibility, and foundation to assist the people and poverty. it's a very low performing school system. there's a high rate of illiteracy. there's something for every foundation in detroit. just recently, actually, you mentioned federal funding, 164 firefighters were laid off as part of this downsizing, as part of this effort for mayor bling to get the finances under control in the city. firefighters, which detroit needs because it's got sort of the highest case of arson in the country. these guys are laid off. about two weeks later, miraculously a hundred guys are rehired. when you look to find out where the money came from, it's actually department of homeland security has the funds for things like that. i don't want to overstate, that's something you want to think about. the department of homeland security needed to step in to keep detroit as safe as it can be for the moment. we're talking about -- i wonder, we seen the auto
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